Hearing affects everything between your ears

 

From Oticon People First – BrainHearingTM – Helping the brain make sense of sound.

Untreated hearing loss increases the risk of mental decline.

Did you know that we hear with our brains, not our ears?
Surprising, perhaps, but true. Our ears simply pick up sounds and pass them to the brain. The brain then turns those sounds into meaning.

Hearing loss is a fact of life. Virtually all of us will experience it. The first sign is that it becomes harder to communicate with people. This may quickly reduce your social contact – whether you notice it or not. And social contact is a vital source of stimulation for the brain. Without it, the risk of mental decline increases. The greater the untreated hearing loss, the greater the risk of dementia.

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Hearing affects everything between your ears

 

A Little Bit of Hearing Humor

 

A Little Bit of Hearing Humor

Humor can sometimes make lite of a serious situation – but it’s a great way to break the ice and start a conversation.
Hearing and quality of life are closely linked. Poor hearing affects both the person with the loss and those with whom they communicate. A comprehensive study on the effects of untreated hearing loss on adults as well as their families found that hearing loss impacts on our social, emotional, psychological and physical well-being.

An elderly gentleman…
Had serious hearing problems for a number of years. He went to the doctor and the doctor was able to have him fitted for a set of hearing aids that allowed the gentleman to hear 100% .
The elderly gentleman went back in a month to the doctor and the doctor said, ‘Your hearing is perfect. Your family must be really pleased that you can hear again.’
The gentleman replied, ‘Oh, I haven’t told my family yet.
I just sit around and listen to the conversations. I’ve changed my will three times!’

Three old guys are out walking.
First one says, ‘Windy, isn’t it?’
Second one says, ‘No, it’s Thursday!’
Third one says, ‘So am I. Let’s go get a beer.’

A man was telling his neighbor, ‘I just bought a new hearing aid. It cost me four thousand dollars, but it’s state of the art. It’s perfect.’
‘Really,’ answered the neighbor ‘What kind is it?’
‘ Twelve thirty.’

And one more…
Morris, an 82 year-old man, went to the doctor to get a physical.
A few days later, the doctor saw Morris walking down the street with a gorgeous young woman on his arm.
A couple of days later, the doctor spoke to Morris and said, ‘You’re really doing great, aren’t you?’
Morris replied, ‘Just doing what you said, Doc: ‘Get a hot mamma and be cheerful.”
The doctor said, ‘I didn’t say that. I said, ‘You’ve got a heart murmur; be careful.’

 

HEARING AWARENESS WEEK

 

HEARING AWARENESS WEEK

ALL EARS FOR HEARING AWARENESS WEEK

One in six Australians is affected by hearing loss – that’s an estimated 3.5 million people.

Hearing loss in Australia is mainly mild in nature, but one third of people experience a loss that is moderate or severe to profound.

The prevalence of hearing loss rises from 1% for people aged younger than 15 years to three in every four people aged over 70 years.

The number of Australians who are hearing impaired or deaf is increasing because of long-term exposure to excessive noise in the workplace, the environment and a result of an ageing population. Hearing loss is projected to increase to 1 in every 4 Australians by 2050..

For HEARING AWARENESS WEEK – Sunday 23rd to Saturday 29th August 2015 Hearing And Audiology will be conducting FREE community screenings:

Wednesday 26th August – DUNCRAIG SENIOR CITIZENS CENTRE – 10.00 AM TO 1.00 PM

Thursday 27th August – WEMBLEY COMMUNITY CENTRE – 1.00 PM to 3.30 PM

During Hearing Awareness Week we are offering FREE screening at our Duncraig and Subiaco Clinics …

For more information:

Appointments

P: (08) 9388 8003

E: info@hearingwa.com.au

 

Hearing Loss and Dementia Linked in Study

Hearing Loss and Dementia Linked in Study

John Hopkins Medicine

Release Date: February 14, 2011

Seniors with hearing loss are significantly more likely to develop dementia over time than those who retain their hearing, a study by Johns Hopkins and National Institute on Aging researchers suggests. The findings, the researchers say, could lead to new ways to combat dementia, a condition that affects millions of people worldwide and carries heavy societal burdens.

Although the reason for the link between the two conditions is unknown, the investigators suggest that a common pathology may underlie both or that the strain of decoding sounds over the years may overwhelm the brains of people with hearing loss, leaving them more vulnerable to dementia. They also speculate that hearing loss could lead to dementia by making individuals more socially isolated, a known risk factor for dementia and other cognitive disorders.

Whatever the cause, the scientists report, their finding may offer a starting point for interventions — even as simple as hearing aids — that could delay or prevent dementia by improving patients’ hearing.

The new study, published in the February Archives of Neurology, focused on 639 people whose hearing and cognitive abilities were tested as part of the BLSA between 1990 and 1994. While about a quarter of the volunteers had some hearing loss at the start of the study, none had dementia.

Volunteers were then closely followed with repeat examinations every one to two years, and by 2008, 58 of them had developed dementia. The researchers found that study participants with hearing loss at the beginning of the study were significantly more likely to develop dementia by the end. Compared with volunteers with normal hearing, those with mild, moderate, and severe hearing loss had twofold, threefold, and fivefold, respectively, the risk of developing dementia over time. The more hearing loss they had, the higher their likelihood of developing the memory-robbing disease.

Even after the researchers took into account other factors that are associated with risk of dementia, including diabetes, high blood pressure, age, sex and race, Lin explains, hearing loss and dementia were still strongly connected.

“A lot of people ignore hearing loss because it’s such a slow and insidious process as we age,” Lin says. “Even if people feel as if they are not affected, we’re showing that it may well be a more serious problem.”

The research was supported by the intramural research program of the National Institute on Aging.

Hearing Loss and Dementia Linked in Study

BrainHearing – the new big thing… SPECIAL OFFER

 

Hearing loss can be tiring. The less ‘sound’ information your brain receives…the harder it has to work!

It’s your brain that hears, not your ears. The sounds your ears receive are sent to your brain where they are translated into meaning. If you suffer from hearing loss, your brain tries to fill in the gaps of sounds you don’t hear. This can be difficult and exhausting, and it makes it harder for you to participate in what is going on around you.

Oticon hearing aids feature BrainHearing™ technology, designed to support your brain and help it make sense of sound, with less effort. This powerful approach enables you to:

  • Organise sounds and orient yousrelf with your surroundings
  • Hear better in challenging environments
  • Understand speech, engage in conversations and switch your focus
  • Listen according to your personal preferences

BrainHearing technology is based on four key features:

Speech Guard E– superb speech recognition

Speech Guard E protects speech clarity and details for you to easily understand what is being said – even in noisy surroundings.

Spatial Sound – locate the sources of sound

Spatial Sound supports your brain’s natural ability to sense where sounds are coming from – even in noisy situations. This helps you know where to focus your attention.

Free Focus – zoom in on what’s most important

Free Focus consists of automatic zoom functions to help you easily focus on the most important sounds. It helps you shift your focus from one conversation to another.

YouMatic – shape the sound to suit you

The way you hear is as unique to you as your DNA. YouMatic is a tool to personalise your hearing instruments to your unique and personal hearing preferences and needs.

At Hearing And Audiology you’ll discover thevery latest in hearing aids powered withOticon BrainHearing technology that automatically adjust and optimise sound…soyou HEAR MORE naturally …and with less effort.

RECEIVE $300 OFF EACH PREMIUM OTICON ALTA BRAINHEARING …HEARING AIDS IN JUNE!

Call Hearing And Audiology now….(08) 9388 8003

*Conditions Apply

BrainHearing - the new big thing

 

Dark chocolate is good for your hearing health

 

Dark chocolate is good for your hearing health

Dark chocolate is good for your hearing health! You may not believe it, but eating your dark chocolate Easter Egg can benefit your hearing due to the abundance of zinc and other antioxidants that protect your inner ears against the most prevalent health threat to the ageing population, which is hearing loss. Another way to obtain zinc is to make sure you take a zinc supplement a day.

Happy Easter Everyone!

Dark chocolate is good for your hearing health